Frequent question: What is graft together in knitting?

Is grafting the same as Kitchener stitch?

Kitchener Stitch Will Make You Fall in Love With Seaming. … It’s called the Kitchener stitch. The Kitchener stitch (also known as “grafting”) involves weaving two live (still on the needle) edges together without creating a ridge — or even a break in the stitching.

How do you graft knit and purl stitches?

If the first two stitches are knit and purl:

  1. Front needle: go into the first stitch knitwise and drop it off, go into the second stitch knitwise and leave it on.
  2. Back needle: go into the first stitch knitwise and drop it off, go into the second stitch purlwise and leave it on.

Why is it called Kitchener Stitch?

During the First World War it is said that Herbert Kitchener, British Secretary of State for War, prompted the invention of a special graft for socks to prevent chafing. It came to be known as ‘the Kitchener Stitch’.

What is live stitch?

The Live Stitch to Bind Off Graft, as the name clearly suggests, is a seaming method that involves seaming one edge with live stitches and another with an edge of either bind off or cast on stitches.

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