Where did a stitch in time come from?

What is the meaning of the idiom A stitch in time saves nine?

The phrase basically means it’s better to solve a problem right away, to stop it becoming a much bigger one. It’s first recorded in a book way back in 1723 and it’s a sewing reference.

What does the expression stitch in time mean?

Definition of a stitch in time (saves nine)

—used to say that it is better to fix a problem when it is small than to wait and let it become a bigger problem.

Who wrote the proverb A stitch in time saves nine?

Answer: This saying first showed up in 1723 by Dr. Thomas Fuller. It was later used in a book called Foul Play by an author known as Reade. The saying then referred to repairing sails on a ship.

Did Benjamin Franklin say a stitch in time saves nine?

Today’s expression, “A stitch in time saves nine,” is several centuries old. Though it may have been popularized by Benjamin Franklin in his “Poor Richard’s Almanac,” it was known before that. The meaning is: If you see a small problem and solve it early, you’ll prevent it from becoming a big problem later.

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Where did the expression Close but no cigar?

The phrase is originated in the United States, likely during the 20th century or earlier. It alludes to the practice of stalls at fairgrounds and carnivals giving out cigars as prizes. This phrase would be used for those who were close to winning a prize, but failed to do so.

Where did a stitch in time saves nine originate?

It’s first recorded in a book way back in 1723 and it’s a sewing reference. The idea is that sewing up a small rip with one stitch means the tear is less likely to get bigger, and need more – or, well, nine – stitches later on.

Where did the saying dressed to the nines originate?

The phrase is said to be Scots in origin. The earliest written example of the phrase is from the 1719 Epistle to Ramsay by the Scottish poet William Hamilton: The bonny Lines therein thou sent me, How to the nines they did content me.

What do you mean by the proof of the pudding is in the eating?

The original proverb is: The proof of the pudding is in the eating. And what it meant was that you had to try out food to know whether it was good. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: … And what it meant was that you had to try out food in order to know whether it was good.

What is the saying many hands make light work?

—used to say that people can do things more quickly and easily when they work together It’s a big job, but many hands make light work.

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What is a stitch?

A stitch is a pain in the abdomen (usually on the side) that’s brought on by activity. It can range from sharp or stabbing to mild cramping, aching or pulling, and may involve pain in the shoulder tip too. Often it leaves you with no choice but to slow down or stop.

What is meant by Look before you leap?

look before you leap. Think of the consequences before you act, as in You’d better check out all the costs before you buy a cellular phone—look before you leap. This expression alludes to Aesop’s fable about the fox who is unable to climb out of a well and persuades a goat to jump in.