Your question: What does embroidery tension mean?

Why is thread tension important?

Although it is possible to change the tension of the bobbin thread, it is typically the tension of the top thread that gets adjusted and this infographic shows you how. Understanding thread tension is important because it also effects the pull of the thread on the fabric, which can cause distortions.

What thread tension should I use?

The dial settings run from 0 to 9, so 4.5 is generally the ‘default’ position for normal straight-stitch sewing. This should be suitable for most fabrics. If you are doing a zig-zag stitch, or another stitch that has width, then you may find that the bobbin thread is pulled through to the top.

Why is my thread bunching underneath?

A: Looping on the underside, or back of the fabric, means the top tension is too loose compared to the bobbin tension, so the bobbin thread is pulling too much top thread underneath. By tightening the top tension, the loops will stop, but the added tension may cause breakage, especially with sensitive threads.

What causes looping in embroidery?

Looping is usually caused by thread tensions that are too loose. It could occur either on the top or bottom of the design. Both bobbin and tensioner could be the culprit. Check if the problem is caused by tensioners by turning tensioner knobs to the right to tighten.

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What tension should I use for thin fabric?

Use size 70/10 for really thin cotton like voile, size 80/12 for light to medium weight cotton, and 90/14 for thick cotton like denim.

What should my stitch length be?

What stitch length should I use?

What is the best stitch for: Suggested Stitch Length (mm) Stitches Per Inch
Standard Stitch Length 2.5 – 3.0 8 – 10
Basting stitch 5.0 – 7.0 4 – 5
Stay-stitching 1.5 – 2.0 12 – 8
Top-stitching – light/medium weight 3.0 – 3.5 7 – 8