You asked: Why does Mama think that Maggie is the rightful owner of the quilts?

Why do you believe Mama wants Maggie to have the quilts instead of Dee?

Mama, the narrator, ultimately gives the family quilts to Maggie instead of Dee (Wangero) because she recognizes that Dee gets everything she wants, that she’s even already claimed the quilts as her own, because they were promised to Maggie, and because Maggie is the daughter who wants them for the right reasons.

What does Mama think of the quilts?

Mama gives her the quilts as a way of acknowledging her past and her pride in her heritage, home, and the “everyday use” of heirlooms. The quilts are emblems of living history. They are like what other family’s might give in terms of inheritances, wills, land, etc…

Why did Mama give Maggie the quilts?

When Mama gives the quilts the Maggie, she ensures that the family heritage will stay alive in the manner she prefers. By using the quilts and making her own when they wear out, Maggie will add to the family’s legacy, rather than distancing herself from it.

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How does mama feel about Maggie?

In Alice Walker’s short story about family and its generational bonds, Mama perceives Maggie as self-effacing, thin, and scarred from burns. She has been like this, chin on chest, eyes on ground, feet in shuffle….

Does Mama regret giving Maggie the quilts?

By giving the quilts to Maggie, Mama in a sense merely fulfills her promise. Mama had previously offered Dee a quilt, years earlier, but the offer had been rejected since quilts at that time were out of style. Maggie’s appreciation of the quilts has been long and consistent and will remain so.

Why does Dee think Mama and Maggie don’t understand their heritage?

Why does Dee think Maggie and Mama don’t understand their heritage? Dee thinks Mama and Maggie don’t understand their heritage because they don’t change from it. In Dee’s mind, Maggie and Mama lack the “Ethnic Pride” to leave the historical borders and live a prosperous life.

What do the quilts mean to Maggie?

What do the quilts mean to Maggie in everyday use? These quilts are familial heirlooms, and Maggie’s mother likes to use them as often as possible. They represent the family’s history and heritage to each character.

How does the mother feel about Maggie in everyday use?

Mama is brutally honest and often critical in her assessment of both Dee and Maggie. She harshly describes shy, withering Maggie’s limitations, and Dee provokes an even more pointed evaluation. Mama resents the education, sophistication, and air of superiority that Dee has acquired over the years.

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What do the quilts represent to Maggie at the end?

The quilts represent Maggie’s triumph at being chosen over dee to receive something. In this case, the concrete object is the family’s antique heirloom quilts Mama promised Maggie would inherit upon her marriage to John Thomas.

Why do you think Maggie gives the quilts to her sister?

Unlike her sister, Dee, Maggie loves the family quilts because she knows the people whose lives and stories are represented by them. She even knows how to quilt herself. Her mother has promised Maggie the quilts, which Dee has already once refused, when she gets married because they are meaningful to her.

What does the quilt represent to Dee to Maggie and to Mama?

The quilts bring together the family in a battle of self identity and history. Maggie was promised the right to them, Dee expects to be given them, and Mama is stuck in the middle of her children and her ancestors.

What does Mama do to show that the quilts belong to Maggie?

When Mama tells Dee that she’s already promised the family quilts to Maggie, Dee actually calls Maggie “backward” because Maggie would put the quilts to “everyday use.” This is precisely what Mama would want her to do.