Frequent question: How do you control mosaic tomatoes?

Does mosaic virus stay in the soil?

Unlike TMV (tobacco mosaic virus), CMV is not seedborne in tomato and does not persist in plant debris in the soil or on workers’ hands or clothing. The occurrence of this virus is erratic and unpredictable; consequently, control of this disease can be difficult.

What causes mosaic on plants?

mosaic, plant disease caused by various strains of several hundred viruses. A number of economically important crops are susceptible to mosaic infections, including tobacco, cassava, beet, cucumber, and alfalfa.

How do you control tomato virus?

Use certified disease-free seed or treat your own seed.

  1. Soak seeds in a 10% solution of trisodium phosphate (Na3PO4) for at least 15 minutes.
  2. Heat dry seeds to 158 °F and hold them at that temperature for two to four days.
  3. Hot water treatment is not adequate for some tomato viruses.

How do you control plant viruses?

Disease control is based on two strategies: i) immunization (genetic resistance obtained by plant breeding, plant transformation, cross-protection, or others), and ii) prophylaxis to restrain virus dispersion (using quarantine, certification, removal of infected plants, control of natural vectors, or other procedures).

Can you eat a watermelon with mosaic virus?

Yes, you can eat squash and melons that are infected with mosaic virus. These viruses are not harmful to humans and do not cause the fruit to rot. Often the discoloration is only skin deep. In cases where fruit are severely distorted, the texture of the fruit may be affected and may not be desirable for eating.

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How quickly does mosaic virus spread?

Comments on the Disease

Cucumber mosaic virus is spread from plant-to-plant by many species of aphids. Aphids only retain the ability to transmit these viruses for very short periods of time (minutes to a few hours). Thus, spread is often very rapid and local.

Which crop is generally affected by mosaic disease *?

Mosaic viruses affect a wide range of edible crops – alfalfa, apples, beans, celery, corn, cucumbers, figs, peppers, spinach, tobacco and tomatoes are some of the more common ones. They can also infect ornamental plants like abultilon, delphinium, gladiola, marigold, petunia and one of the most notable, roses.